Abstracts September 2007
Vol.16 No 3

Management of competing demands on urban freight corridors

Paper 1

Euan D. Ramsay and Jonathan M. Bunker

Refereed Paper

This paper has been critically reviewed by at least two recognised experts in the field. It is based on a reviously-unpublished paper that was awarded the Rodney Vaughan Memorial Prize for Best Postgraduate Research at the 27th Conference of Australian Institutes of Transport Research, held in Brisbane, 7–9 December, 2005.
Originally submitted: January 2006

Abstract

This paper compares the performance under various scenarios of an urban traffic corridor section subjected to a range of vehicle types. A micro-simulation-based model of the corridor was developed from first principles to assign characteristics and headways stochastically for each vehicle and then to track each vehicle as it moved along the corridor. Kinematic behaviour of the different vehicle types (ranging from passenger cars through to B-doubles) was obtained from GPS data collected during a series of chase car surveys on an urban arterial freight route in suburban Brisbane. Corridor performance was reported in terms of intersection capacity and delays as well as travel speeds and stop rates for each vehicle type. The performance of the corridor was found to be sensitive to traffic control measures, including the speed limit and traffic signal controller settings such as cycle time and progression design speed. A range of freight policy scenarios were examined, including the effects of increasing freight volumes, choice of freight vehicles used, and vehicle type-specific lane restrictions. Some policies having the potential to improve corridor traffic performance and freight efficiency were able to be identified.

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Distances people walk for transport

Paper 2

Matthew Burke and A.L. Brown

Refereed Paper

This paper has been critically reviewed by at least two recognised experts in the field.
Originally submitted: July 2007

Abstract

We present detailed information on the distances people walk for transport purposes in Brisbane, Australia. The data is derived from the South East Queensland Travel Survey 2003-04 – Brisbane Statistical Division, a household travel survey providing information on the weekday travel of 10 931 respondents, weighted and expanded for a city population of 1 615 579 persons. The vast majority of non-motorised travel recorded was walking for transport, whether this comprised trips using the walking mode only, or whether it was walking made to and from public transport. We report the full distributions of the distances walked for transport from homes to other places, as well as the walk travel made between places other than homes. Single-mode walk trips are longer than the walk trip stages made to and from public transport, both in terms of distance and time. However, there are more than twice as many walk trip stages made to and from public transport. The median and 85th percentile distances people walk from home to all other places using the walk mode only are 780 m and 1.45 km respectively; from home to all public transport stops, 600 m and 1.30 km; and from public transport stops to end destinations, 470 m and 1.09 km.

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A state-wide analysis of prehospital injuries and fatalities resulting from motorcycle road accidents in Queensland

Paper 3

Jeremy Davey, Emma L Enraght-Moony, Vivienne C Tippett, James Freeman, Dale Steinhardt and Darren Wishart

Refereed Paper

This paper has been critically reviewed by at least two recognised experts in the field.
Originally submitted: January 2007

Abstract

The present study examined the prevalence and characteristics of pre-hospital injuries and fatalities involving motorcycle riders in Queensland. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of all motorcycle road crashes that were attended by the Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) over a five year period (1999-2003). A total of 6145 motorcycle-related incidents were recorded by the QAS during the study period, of which 113 incidents involved a deceased rider. Importantly, there was a 34% increase in the total number of motorcycle injury-related cases over the 5 year period, as well as an increase in the number of pre-hospital deaths. A further comparative analysis revealed some level of disparity between QAS data and corresponding official motorcycle injury records that are predominantly utilised to inform motorcycle policy. The reasons for this discrepancy and the implications of the findings are further examined in the paper.

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Public transport trends - efficiency and equity considerations

Paper 4

John B. Cox

Invited Paper

This unrefereed paper is an expanded version of an article originally published in Issues (No. 76, September 2006). It is published here at the invitation of the Editor in order to make the data it contains accessible to a wider audience. The Editor invites written discussion on the paper.

Abstract

The paper summarises data from Australian government sources that show the decline in public transport use per capita and in relative terms as a mode of travel. The data also shows that, despite the fact that it caters for less than 10% of passenger trips, public transport has received twice as much Victorian government budget funding as have roads in recent years. It points out that the level of public transport subsidies per capita increases with the extent of public transport in Australian cities and questions whether an increase in public transport expenditure can be justified on social equity grounds, since the inherent subsidy benefits higher income rather than lower income people. These subsidies reduce expenditures on other social programs such as health and education where the expenditure distribution is more equitable. Higher density cities tend to have higher traffic densities, despite their lower rate of car travel per capita, and therefore experience a greater intrusiveness of the car. The densities of Australian cities are low relative to the USA and Europe and experience lower vehicle-related emission and pollution levels, so that overseas experiences should not be directly translated to Australian cities. The Grubler model of transport infrastructure trends shows that the decline in public transport will not be reversed by increased public transport expenditures. The model also indicates that road transport in Australia is in a very mature stage and shows signs of being replaced by the next transport technology stage.

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